A look back

The Coyote Cam started as a lark some few years back but only this year has it evolved into a concerted effort to study Coyotes and their habitats. The following is a simplistic overview of how Coyotes came to be in our neighborhoods. A few things about Coyotes are fact; Coyotes adapt, Coyotes thrive where other animals fail, and Coyotes will always be with us. It is hoped that the sharing of this material will provide some Coyote knowledge to all who follow this blog.  Coyotes are not going away, learning to coexist is a better alternative.

Long before civilization began to intrude on wild life Coyotes had a few predators- mainly wolves, mountain lions and some times, bobcats. Life was good for the Coyote as they would often feast on animals killed by the larger predators. Unfortunately, the Coyote became the next meal when those larger predators returned to reclaim their kills. The Coyotes soon understood that in order to survive they would need to expand their food sources to avoid being eaten themselves. Avoiding those larger predators the Coyote developed stealth or as some call it – shape sifting. Coyotes are stealthy but stealthy only goes so far when you are hungry. The Coyotes were not picky eaters then or now so the smaller game population of rabbits and squirrels provided an alternative to hazardous left over carcasses. Not only were the smaller game less attractive to the wolves, mountain lions and bobcats but the squirrels and rabbits often had larders of seeds and berries. The Coyotes learned that rabbits and squirrels equated to seeds and berries which could be another food source in difficult times.

About the time civilization (farmers & ranchers) showed up Coyotes found that their predators were disappearing. Any time ranchers and farmers lost livestock it wasn’t the lowly little Coyote’s fault, it was the larger predators killing the livestock. If a framer or rancher could shoot anything with four legs it was probably going to be the larger predators – wolves, mountain lions and bobcats.  To put it simply, the Coyote saw and learned that when man showed up it was hiding time.  The Coyote had a long history of being stealthy and it was probably that trait that saved the species for years to come.  As the Coyote’s predators were thinned out by man the Coyotes expanded into new territories and thrived. New and larger hunting areas, better den sites, larger families.  Life was good.

Life was good as long as agriculture was the core industry of the Coyote’s environment.  Alas, the world was evolving. Agriculture was giving way to manufacturing – the new industry! Some ranchers and farmers found that they could sell off some of their acreage to developers and acquire more land further away from cities.  As more and more land was being converted to home sites there was less and less agriculture, man was moving into the Coyote’s neighborhood.  Barely a hundred years has passed and man is living in what used to be the Coyotes backyard, a few generations later and man is now the Coyote’s next door neighbor.  Wait a minute here – man is at the hierarchy of life so why is it that man is considered the new entity on the Coyote’s block?  Current media reports that Coyotes are appearing in our neighborhoods so how is it that Man is considered “the new guy on the Coyote’s block?”  At first this new arrival was more deadly then the Coyote’s former predators.  Hunting territory was cut into fenced off lots, vegetation which provided concealment for the Coyote was cut down and replaced by roads. Vehicles that traveled the roads killed Coyotes (and their prey) in large numbers.  Coyotes are resilient, they remembered what it was like to be hunted. The Coyote retreated into the background but they did not go away!  Their numbers were fewer because both their hunting territories and available den sites were being reduced as humans built ever larger homes.

Ah – but the humans brought with them pets and backyard feeders. In addition to those pet and backyard feeders Coyotes found that many humans threw out uneaten foods – garbage? By golly these humans are good neighbors after all, they build city parks around their homes! The trees in the park grow old, the old trees have hollows and cavities good for dens.  Some previous Coyote hunting grounds were being converted into human entertainment, baseball parks, football stadiums and best of all – huge parking lots like the one at Solder Stadium in Chicago. The Coyote Cam reader will remember that Soldier Stadium is also home to a family of Coyotes.  Looks like the good times have returned if you are a Coyote.

Get out there and enjoy a walk this Spring!

Stay tuned, there is more to come on the Coyote Cam.

Damned if you do, Damned if you don’t!

The number of family run American farm and ranch numbers are dwindling being replaced in large part by corporate commercial operations. Every year sees another farmer or rancher taking a second job to augment their agriculture careers.  In addition, financially they are being forced to sell off land as it becomes more valuable as a sub-development rather then for growing crops or raising livestock.  Other factors to consider are the stigma of not only trying to protect ones animals against predators but the harvesting of agriculture animals.  More and more animal protection groups only see suffering animals in rural America, no comments about the need for production of protein products!  Meanwhile, consumers only complain when their grocery store / market prices increase.

Through out American history farmers and ranchers have tried several methods to eliminate predation

  bear-trap

Most “leg traps” were used by trappers in order to preserve as much of the animal pelt as was possible. Farmers and ranchers knew that the leg traps could be used very effectively against large predators as well and additionally, the pelt provided another source of revenue.  However, the leg traps could and did trap livestock.  It wasn’t until later that poisons were used though there were as many negative side effects as there were positive ones!

Livestock Protection Collar
Predator Control Device

First came the neck strap packet of poison. Most predators attack their victims by clamping their jaws on the victim’s neck.  The action of clamping down on the neck strap released a poison into the attacker’s mouths.  Unfortunately, the animal wearing the neck strap most always died or was severely injured!  Loosing livestock is not a good thing so another delivery system that did not kill or maim the livestock was needed.

  M44 diagram

The ground delivery system as its name implies is buried in the ground with the top “bait” portion exposed.  The “bait” is treated with a predator attractant.  The system is powered to thrust the bait and poison  into the animal’s mouth and throat when it is clamped down on and tugged.  No livestock are harmed and the predator is eliminated.  However, the unintended consequences of poisons is that it doesn’t stop with the intended recipient.  Most of the poisons used were supposed to be fast acting but many factors did not make it so.  The varmints would devour their meal then wonder off and die.  The poisoned predator would eventually be consumed by (vultures) other carnivores who in turn were poisoned by the tainted predator, the poison kept on working through multiple exposures!

Several media comments and or “Letters to the Editor” espouse support for hunting but then oppose trapping or the use of “mechanical calling techniques.” The “conflicted hunters” then make a scary statement about the “carnage” resulting from Coyote Hunting Contests often including pictures of multiple dead coyotes. The one thing the contest opponents fail to mention is that the system far out weighs what had gone on before. Ever watch a poisoned animal die?  A shooter can and does discriminate targets making the coyote the only animal that is eliminated!  As long as his livestock are not shot few ranchers / farmers are too concerned about the sudden decline in the number of four legged predators.

Stay tuned there is more to come on the Coyote Cam.

Its them or me-

The hierarchy of nature dictates that prevailing weather will control the environment which then dictates the level of animal habitation. Early Europeans settling in the US found hearty soil capable of growing more crops with not near the exertion required in their home lands.  Growing seasons were longer and in most cases more moderate.  Clear out a few trees and mend the rocky soil and abundant crops would result!  The cattle ranchers did not need to bend their back to the soil but instead required open prairies with a plentiful water supply.  While these two life styles would seem dissimilar in fact animals were needed on the farm – milk cows, chickens and heavier animals for plowing.  Humans have noted that domesticated animals thrive when they are grazed rather then being fed.  Healthy livestock fare better in transportation then animals simply fed  Yes, livestock are fattened up in feed lots but grazing makes for more durable animals! Where ever you find livestock you will find predators ready to stalk them, it is nature.  The sad part of nature is that when humans interfere nature suffers.  Interference is not part of nature yet humans continually try to alter the outcome nature has set in motion.

Predators are born with a sense of smell far more advanced then others. Don’t forget that dogs and cats are predators too.  Ever notice how they can sense food left out on a counter?  Back to the wilds – bears, large cats and canines can smell other animals in distress.  In as much as bears, large cats and wolfs are pretty well hunted out that leaves the Coyote.  Livestock placentas are extremely motivating as a predator food source.  Earlier on in this blog’s history a rancher was interviewed in relation to a Coyote Hunting Contest and she related the following story in support of the contests.  The rancher knew one of her cows was in the final stage of delivering.  As most cows do they try to find a spot away from the others to give birth. The rancher found the cow and watched a calf being born. From out of the bush a Coyote appeared and went after the half born calf. The birthing cow could not do anything in defense as the calf was not fully delivered.  The rancher said she didn’t have a gun but did her best to scare the Coyote off.  Unfortunately, the Coyote had a firm hold on the unborn calf and during the struggle between the cow, the Coyote and the rancher- the unborn calf was fatally injured.  The struggle proved to be too much for the cow as well, she died from shock and loss of blood a bit later.  The rancher lost not just the calf but the cow as well.  This is not an isolated story either, all domesticated animals are subject to the same fate.  Coyotes do not kill for sport but to satisfy hunger and they are aggressive during that activity.

This brings us back to the opening comments.

coyote-hunting-tactics
Coyote Hunting Contests

Look up Coyote Hunting Contests and there will be a few internet sites advocating the sport yet many, many more suggesting the Contests are nothing more then legalized mass animal killings.  Passing through the western and southwestern part of the United States the visitor will find an agrarian environment, long and empty miles of nothing but cattle or sheep.  Often you can travel for several hours and never see another vehicle.  Yet, just like others east of the Mississippi ranchers and farmers dread losing the extra help directly and indirectly provided by the state.  Just like the loss of family produce farms will eventually impact everyone’s kitchen so too will the loss of livestock.  It is time to take a realistic look at animal predation before it is too late.

Stay tuned, there is more to come on the Coyote Cam!

On the other hand, Coyote Hunting

For some time this blog has been dedicated to urban interaction with Coyotes.  A few readers asked why not look at the Coyote from the other side?  The urban Coyote has a comfortable life compared to the suburbs or worse yet, rural lands.  For the remainder of this year (2017) we will shift our focus to Coyote survival in rural areas.  The farmer’s and rancher’s lively hood is at stake every day with weather as the primary detriment and livestock predation a close second.  The USDA-National Agricultural Statistics Service is referenced for this and other articles. Sheep and lamb mortality can be as high as 80 percent in some cases almost entirely due to Coyote predation.  Cattle are much larger and hence their size poses a problem for Coyotes but not one that can’t be over come.  The young and sick have always been targets for predators and cattle are no exception.  Cattle ranchers constantly struggle with predation and calving operations are extremely vulnerable to the coyote when mom and dad coyote are teaching their pups!  When the average size livestock loss is running over $50,000 per year something has to be done.  Fare warning here, the following material may not be suitable for all readers.

 

 When Buffalo roamed the American prairies the Wolf, for many years, reigned supreme as the canine alpha predator!  The lowly Coyote learned to survive using stealth and cunning to evade the Wolf as well other predators.  Alas, as the human migration pushed ever westward the Wolf was hunted to the verge of extinction.  Trappers and commercial hunters severely reduced wild life populations (think buffalo) but it was the settlers who had the most detrimental impact on the alpha predator population!  Farmers and ranchers saw the Wolf, Mountain Lion and Bear as the primary reason for livestock losses!  As a result the Coyote’s primary nemesis was eliminated and the Coyote’s hunting territory expanded as well as his reproductive activity.  Interestingly, many studies have shown that Coyotes live about six to eight years in the wild.  Conversely, in captivity Coyotes can live twelve plus years.  Other studies found that during the least stressful periods wild Coyote pups survival averages around one or two pups out of six.  Amazingly, when external pressures exist (hunting or higher level predators) pup survival can be 100 percent.  In the case of elevated pressures suggestions are that with the removal of the adult Coyotes the pups have more on which to survive.

 

 

Coyote hunting contests have been around for years although on a smaller scale following the demise of the Coyote’s predators. 

early-coyote-hunting
Early Coyote Hunting

The agriculture community would come together to hunt the Coyotes as needed.  Returning home to the Southwest part of the country in the late 60s a few ex-helicopter pilots found new jobs shooting Coyotes with a shotgun from their low flying helicopters.

helicoyotehunting
Helicopter Coyote Shooter

The Coyote Cam reader has probably heard of the “Duck Call,” “Goose Call,” and a “Turkey Call,”  The next advance in Coyote Hunting came with the mechanical Coyote Call.  Coyote Calling has become big business as there are no licenses required to hunt the Coyote. 

coyote-call-results
Coyote Caller and Results

Today, Coyote Hunting has become a contest to see who can harvest the maximum numbers of Coyotes over a given weekend with a trophy or reward given out.  Several gun shops around the southwest, in conjunction with a few farmers and ranchers, have devised an annual Coyote Hunting Contest.  What is interesting is that even after these events the next season’s Coyote population shows little, if any, reduction in numbers.

 

 

 

Stay tuned, there is more to come on the Coyote Cam.

 

Something is a foot

Perspective is every thing! A new camera and a different angle of view makes a lot of difference when trying to photograph Coyotes.

M2E3L1-1R350B320

OH – and the bait as well.

M2E1L0-1R350B320

In the past this blog has stressed what not to do such as leaving bird feeders unattended, letting debris and litter stack up on the ground. It draws bait – er . . I mean rodents and small game such as the rabbit pictured above.  As it turns out there are also plants that have seed and seed pods left over from the past summer.  This author has discovered that these seed sources not only draw small four legged game but birds as well.  Unfortunately, the birds draw household cats (pets maybe).  The trail camera kept recording cats but those random pictures just did not seem appropriate for a blog about Coyotes.  Talk about the wrong perspective!  Several articles presented here reflect that cats, along with small dogs are often Coyote fodder. But that is a story for another edition.  Back to the pictured rabbit.  Seems the Coyote was hot on the scent of the rabbit!  Several pictures show the rabbit then a few minutes later, the Coyote shows up with his nose to the ground as seen in the above picture.  Yes, one photo is dated several days before giving the impression the Coyote was a bit early.  Let us just say that they did cross paths and there is now one less rabbit in the neighborhood.  Last evening several Coyotes were howling away down by the river.  Maybe, it was because there is a newcomer to the Coyotes, an owl.

owl-on-the-roof

This bad boy (girl?) stood about two feet high and in flight, appeared to have a six foot wing span. The lighting was not what is pictured, it was actually late sunset / early evening. Very limited lighting at best.  For you photographers out there – Canon Rebel T3i, F 3.5, telephoto lens at 200mm and shutter speed around 125.  Post processing to clean up noise and finally, cropped to the subject.  OK – it was not the trail camera but who said wildlife was going to be on the trail camera only?  The Coyote Cam is attempting an improved photography mode in the coming months.  The advanced mode should drastically improve quality.

How was your Thanksgiving?

I hope it was a good one!

Stay tuned – there is more to come from the Coyote Cam.

Pumpkins and Autumn Leaves

Where has the time gone? In the last column this author noted that Halloween marks the beginning of a new episode in the life cycle of Coyotes.  Many of you will recall the cartoon character Wiley E. Coyote.  Born under the pen of Chuck Jones, Warner Brother’s Animation Department in 1948 Wiley Coyote celebrates his 68th birthday this year.  This blogger recalls his childhood days watching many ill fated chase scenes wherein the Coyote was this close to catching his arch nemesis the Roadrunner.  Unlike his real life counterpart Wiley E. Coyote resorted to all kinds of notorious means to catch the Roadrunner but frequently found himself blown-up and face down in the dirt!  It seems we may have a bit of Wiley E. Coyote in the Coyote Cam.  The original camera departed this earth several years ago and was replaced by Coyote Camera II.  Coyote Camera II crashed for unknown reasons this past summer and it too, was replaced.  Coyote Camera III started operating independently and was sent in for repairs as was briefly mentioned in a prior posting.  Coyote Camera III is now reported as missing in transit.  Apparently, Coyote Camera III was being shipped home along with someone’s New Year’s Fireworks Show when disaster struck. The shipping company reports the shipping trailer blew up following a wreck.  Local reporters said the inferno put on quite a show and that there was an extensive debris field surrounding the crater where the truck and trailer exploded.

One of the regular followers of the Coyote Cam sent the following link, give it a look.  “Coyote” by Don Williams.  Really expresses the true state of our favorite four legged varmint.  The Coyote has been around the United States for a long time, it has not only survived its prairie peers, it has thrived.  Many followers know that the Coyote began its life in the west central part of the continental United States and expanded its territory from coast to coast and as far north as Alaska and south into Central America.  This blog attempts to capture stories related to Coyotes and over the years of watching the internet has seen a rise in Coyote and human interactions.  Many city dwellers seem horrified when a Coyote is seen walking down a city street while urbanites tend to be less emotional, at least that is the perspective this author perceives.  It is not that urbanites are less attuned to the Coyote’s proximity but that they and rural citizens know it is easier to maintain a balance, the Coyote population will adjust to its environment.  More food, more Coyotes.  Less food, fewer Coyotes!  But it is not just the food that makes it easy or hard for Coyote survival, it is the presence of a habitat.  Food can be scouted out as long as there is a den for family life not far away.  Hard life has taught the Coyote many lessons and Mother Nature has provided the Coyote an innate sense of reproduction.

Oh Yeah – the latest Coyote Cam arrived (number IV), I am some what concerned as there are burn marks on one edge! At any rate, it was put up today, Friday the 11th of November.  There may or may not be pictures for the bi-weekly publication of the blog due out the 15th.  We will see, my bet is that a Coyote will show up and the camera will not catch it.  Kind of a reversal on Wiley E. Coyote if you catch the inference?

Stay tuned, there is more to come on the Coyote Cam – maybe.

Every one have a Happy Thanksgiving!!!

Has the year gone by already??

It’s Halloween and you are out with the little goblins and witches, what are you thinking? It seems like we were just enjoying summer yet here is the prelude to the holidays – Halloween.  It is still some time to the beginning of Winter which arrives December 21st.  Coyotes will likely be in hiding with all the noise and commotion of the day so why worry. Halloween is the day for candy wrappers to be flying in the wind, happy ghosts will be running ahead and not paying attention to where their feet will land. Kiddos eh?  Mom and Dad Coyote are actually breathing a sigh of relief much as does the human folks when school starts.  Halloween marks that time of the year when the Coyote offspring are preparing to go out on their own.

The cycle of Coyote life generally has the pups hunting with their parents about this time of the year. Nature is encouraging the pups to soon leave their den. Coyotes are seen with regularity at this time of the year because the pups are leaving the den to learn about life.  Maybe that is why the Coyote population always seems to increase at this time of the year.  More and more animal control offices are reporting growing numbers of Coyotes these days.  Winter is coming and the once dependent pups now young adult Coyotes are nature bound to find their own den and food for the cold and scarce months ahead.  No – not just yet, there is much to be learned over the coming fall months as each day grows shorter and the nights long and cold.  The immediate future will reinforce hunting skills although most of them will not survive these times.  Those Coyotes that do survive will be stronger then their parents because each generation will have improved their survival capabilities.

The Coyote Pups watch as their parents hunt and then stalk needed food for the families. The pups watch the parents fade into the background in order to avoid larger predators or to sneak up on their prey. The parents move ever so slowly so as not to draw attention which is the same skill needed to overcome unsuspecting prey and avoid humans.

The stealthy skill needed to avoid humans and predators is the same used to gather food. Halloween lives on for small game but for the human children it is only a single night of fright. This is the day that marks the beginning of the end for many young Coyotes.  The Coyote pups are gathering knowledge for the coming days when they will be out on their own and have to survive or die.

Stay tuned – there is more to come on the Coyote Cam. Thanks for your time.

Video of an attack?

Most, if not all, of these postings warn that Coyotes are all around us. This author set up a trail camera (affectionately dubbed the “Coyote Cam”) over a game trail just outside of our back fence.  After recovering several photographs of this game trail the most traveled animal turned out to be the Coyote.  Photographs of the Coyotes appear at all times of the day even though this predator is more nocturnal in its comings and goings.  A disclaimer here is that our family enjoys bird feeders and a large gurgling water fountain in our back yard.  Unfortunately these items do draw any animals walking the game trail mentioned above.   Cleaning the area is a must to minimize predators hanging around!  The water fountain is turned off at sun down. Then, a lot of time is expanded in removing seeds dropped from the feeders to the ground to reduce the number of  mice, squirrels and rodents (the favorite foods of Coyotes)!  Nonetheless, Coyotes are not specifically meat eaters.  Coyotes are opportunistic and will eat what ever is available including any missed seeds from the bird feeders.  The things in nature we enjoy are also the things that entice predators.  This is the core message of this blog – remove any enticements and make the predators unwelcome!!

If there is little to no food available for the Coyote they will look next for shelter. Having a dry comfortable den close to a food source is a good thing for a Coyote.  Hazing or being an objectionable host deters the Coyote and they will seek other areas!  Now . . . there are some humans out there that have too much time on their hands with nothing to do.  Remember the old adage, “idle hands are the Devil’s workshop?”  Baiting Coyotes, or any animal / bird is nothing new but video taping the act . . . well – lets just say its questionable at best.   Having said that the following link is a video of a “Coyote Attack?” from several years back.   The video is a good review of what NOT TO DO.  Tease / bait a Coyote.  Coyotes will remember where they had an interesting time.

 

 

YouTube has some great Coyote footage but be warned it can be a bit gruesome for the faint of heart. It is interesting that over the last few years readers and viewers have taken up the Coyote’s cause.  However, there does not seem to be a middle ground of affection for the Coyote.  You either hate / fear this predator or leave it alone to make a home in your midst.   Better still, are the folks who figure the Coyote is not going anywhere and rather then having their live stock eaten will provide the Coyotes an alternative food supply.  This alternative food supply works up to the point when it is not present.  With that in mind the Coyote will always go with Plan B, the live stock!  The feasibility of providing an alternative food source is still under review.

Have you seen Coyotes in your neighborhood? If so what have you done on a personal level to get rid of the offending Coyote?  The next time you see a Coyote call your local animal control agency (along side of the police and fire department’s emergency numbers insert the local animal control telephone number), most do not have an after hour’s number so you will probably be redirected to the police department.  Keep a note of where, when and if the animal exhibited any strange behaviors (walking wobbly or appeared to have been injured). Injured animals will more readily use their teeth if they can not retreat!  While you are out walking be alert, carry a stick or golf club, a loud whistle and be prepared to stand your ground.  Coyotes can be persistent as was seen in the above link.

That is it for this edition – if you have any questions please feel free to post.

Stay tuned, there is more to come on the Coyote Cam

A dead battery?

The National Parks Service (NPS) “collars” Coyotes. As well, a lot of animals are collared by multiple entities and the collar tags given numbers to differentiate the data obtained from that collared animal. Interesting stuff, really! Take for instance P-22 or as some of you may know him, the Big Cat of Hollywood.

http://proof.nationalgeographic.com/2013/11/14/a-cougar-ready-for-his-closeup/

The data from that collar provided insight on the comings and goings of an urban, male Mountain Lion. Best known for its photograph with the famous Hollywood sign in the back ground P-22 gained a lot of notoriety when it apparently consumed a Los Angeles Zoo Koala Bear for dinner.

To a lesser degree C- 144, an alpha-female Coyote and C-145, a male Coyote are being tracked through out Western Los Angeles.

https://www.nps.gov/samo/blogs/Location-Location-Location.htm

The alpha-female Coyote’s tracking data has raised some eye brows as she crosses the infamous Los Angeles Freeways seemingly at will. Based on the data and follow-up field assessments it appears urban animals have evolved or at least learned to survive just about anything humans can throw at them.   C-145 enjoys the leisurely life style of most young males, feeding and mating whenever the occasion arises. For what ever reason even though both Coyotes were tagged about the same time they never seem to cross paths. On a side note here: It should be pointed out that a lot of states and their larger communities are working to provide all wild life a safe means to cross freeway systems such as tunnels and walk-ways. Nonetheless, it would seem the animals in this review are not doing a bad job of finding their own way, Thank You Very Much! Ah but now comes the sad part of this story- the battery went dead. C-144 had just returned from one of her long jaunts, another eye-popping event as most alpha-female Coyotes seldom if ever leave their home turf. After only a day or so after her out of territory walk C-144 went blank. She was seen with the collar but obviously the collar was malfunctioning and is most probably attributed to a dead battery. Here is the problem, once tagged Coyotes are not often recaptured to be retagged. So now the previous C-144 is more a dead weight on the female Coyote’s torso. Will we see more of this female Coyote? Probably. She seems to have lasted a lot longer then her counterparts. Several more Coyote stories are coming in these days from Columbus Georgia up to New York and even further north to New Brunswick Canada. New Brunswick media reflected on last winter’s Coyote eliminations by a local fur trapper. He related that the local deer populations were down but Coyote numbers seemed greater then in years past. The trapper suggested that the Coyote numbers would fall as they rely on deer for a major part of their diets. Followers of this blog will recognize the relationship between Coyotes and food sources. Unfortunately, the urban animals don’t just rely on a single food source. Specifically, urban Coyotes have come to understand we humans discard sufficient food sources as well as shelter. Unlike the New Brunswick Fur Trapper above, readers understand that just like C-144 even though we can’t track her, from time to time we will see her.

Stay tuned, there is more to come from the Coyote Cam

Survival and Motherhood

Readers will note from previous articles this author chooses to reflect on Coyotes’ existence as opposed to whether the animal should be exterminated or allowed to coexist within our environments. Every card carrying hunter that ever existed will never let an animal suffer, there are no ends legitimate hunters will go to recover what they hunt.

If you will- the following is a short story based on true incidents from Salvang, California.

This morning was one of those bright, sunny spring days in the Santa Yanez Valley of California. The air was not cold but it was crisp which made her happy since her exertions would be difficult on warmer summer days. Running across the top of a hill Angel was only slightly behind when the leader seemed to tumble and fall. She stopped in her tracks looking at the bloodied head of her mate, he was not breathing. A sudden blow hit her between the eyes and as she rolled with the impact Angel knew her life was in danger. She had to get away quickly. Running for her life her head now throbbed with what ever had hit her skull, her eyes beginning to blur. Knowing she could not see well enough for a long sprint to safety Angel did what came naturally to her, she found a brush covered depression and laid down to hide. The pain in her head behind her eyes was now so intense she grind her teeth. Suddenly Angel sensed footsteps approaching, she held her breath and laid motionless. The voices were unintelligible and she didn’t recognize their language, her head was about to explode from the pain! Minutes passed as she lay absolutely still with her eyes closed. The danger’s scent and nearness beginning to fade, its movement going past and beyond her. She waited almost all day hoping she could rise and move, her body stiff from the intense constraints of hiding.

She could feel the warmth of the morning sun but now there was a new danger even worse then the horror of the previous day. She had opened her eyes but she couldn’t see. The world was a blur, she could no longer distinguish shapes every thing ran together. Before yesterday Angel and her mate were free sprits with the valley and reservoir as their play ground, food and water abundant. Today Angel was alone, blind and hungry. To make matters even worse she knew she was pregnant and her delivery not far off, she had to find food. Several days later and without much more then seeds to eat she could smell water not far away. She remembered a large reservoir but unable to see, she tripped and fell down the steep embankment to the dry bottom. California was in the midst of one of the worst droughts in recorded history. Angele lost consciousness.

Some days later she could feel and sense a friendly human prescience. She didn’t try to run this time, all of her energy spent. She lost consciousness again as her pain racked body was lifted upward. That afternoon she awoke to find her wounds bandaged, no longer hungry, still blind but now with a new sense of safety. Some how she knew she and her babies would be safe.

By Associated Press

Published: Wednesday, April 13th, 2016 at 2:23pm
Updated: Wednesday, April 13th, 2016 at 8:54pm
Angel
In an April 3, 2016 photo, a female coyote known as Angel rests in an enclosure at a wildlife rehabilitation center in Solvang, Calif.

A female coyote known as Angel rests in an enclosure at a wildlife rehabilitation center in Solvang, Calif., on April. (Katie Falkenberg/Los Angeles Times)

SOLVANG, Calif. — First, rescuers realized the emaciated coyote they pulled from the bottom of an empty reservoir in Southern California was blind from being shot between the eyes. Then, X-rays showed the near-death animal was pregnant. After a month long regimen of care, including intravenous fluids and vitamins, the coyote gave birth at an animal hospital to a litter of five healthy puppies.

Angel
In an April 3, 2016 photo, In April 3, 2016 photo, five pups that the coyote known as Angel, recently gave birth to sleep in an enclosure at a wildlife rehabilitation center in Solvang, Calif.

Julia Di Sieno of the Animal Rescue Team in Solvang found the coyote in the reservoir after a call came into her hotline Feb. 11. The coyote was bleeding and having trouble breathing.  Di Sieno climbed down 30 feet into the stone-and-mortar reservoir and loaded the wounded animal onto a gurney. She named it Angel.  Examinations revealed Angel had been shot between the eyes, and the bullet blinded her. The coyote then likely wandered the Santa Ynez Valley north of Santa Barbara for days or weeks until she tumbled into the reservoir, Di Sieno said.  “What this animal endured is beyond comprehension,” Di Sieno told the Los Angeles Times for a story Wednesday “When she had puppies, I didn’t know whether to cry in sadness or for joy.”  Five pups that the coyote known as Angel recently gave birth to sleep in an enclosure at a wildlife rehabilitation center in Solvang, Calif., on April 3. (Katie Falkenberg/Los Angeles Times)  She plans to care for the puppies until they are mature enough to be released in the surrounding mountains. Di Sieno hopes to keep Angel as a surrogate mother for young coyotes that her nonprofit rescues. But first she has to persuade the state Department of Fish and Wildlife not to euthanize it. In California, possession of a coyote is illegal unless permitted by the state.

Fish and Wildlife spokesman Andrew Hughan told the Times the agency is looking for a reasonable solution.  “The department appreciates Julia and the rescue team’s efforts to save this coyote and other wildlife,” he said. “We’ve worked closely with her over the years and appreciate her passion for rescuing imperiled wildlife.”

Julia Di Sieno, the executive director and co-founder of the wildlife rehabilitation center Animal Rescue Team in Solvang, Calif., feeds a baby squirrel that was brought to her center after someone in the area found it. (Katie Falkenberg/Los Angeles Times)

Angel
In an April 3, 2016 photo, Julia Di Sieno, the executive director and co-founder of the wildlife rehabilitation center, “Animal Rescue Team,” in Solvang, Calif., feeds a baby squirrel that was brought to her center after someone in the area found it.

 

Stay Tuned- There is more to come on the Coyote Cam.